First Podcast!

Here’s the story that predictive texting helped us create in the end:

What are your parents and I got in the basement of your academic institution?

Hey dude that is privileged material for me.

Alright well I’m going back to the future of our lives and then you can just do our own project.

Well you still have some fun things to consider before we begin by on January.

Time flies when we are having problems that can arise.

We will provide you with the chemicals that you need of the past year, or if you want me to check the box for the drug dealer…

How are they gonna donate their “green beans” to the future generations of your fellow citizens with everything about to go down?

I don’t know how to burn the people that you have been eating.

Whatever happens after this is not to be confused with other things that the government should consider using.

OK cool I’m going to wait and stuff after the government has been generated.

I’ll email you the best and most popular stories of the galaxy on your computer and then I gotta prepare for the future. Okay? So you can just vent and I will give you guys that day off.

Thanks for getting me the best thing ever.


Reflection

Assignment 7. This assignment is probably the one I had the most fun making for this digital portfolio. We had to make something using a form of media we had never used before. It was a little nerve racking, putting something like this online, but I’d never actually start the podcast I’ve been meaning to start, if I never tried. The embarrassment wave is sure to hit me sometime soon…

For me, writing is much more digestive, for lack of a better term, for thought processing. I can take my time to chew and reflect on whatever experience I had. I can have the time to make connections, draw parallels, go back and fix something, clarify something, whatever it may be. With a podcast, you’re very much a prisoner of time in that you can’t really do those things, you can only edit things out later. You’re forced to live in the moment, because for better or worse, that moment will be frozen and preserved thereafter.

As a result, I can tell these podcasts are going to be much lighter than my Light Within posts. Conversations with people, stories and narratives with a more “authentic” feel in that nothing on the podcast will ever be as structured and crafted as blogpost content. But you never know. In a way blog content is an exposure of the internal processes, and the podcast is an exposure of the external. Listening back, I hadn’t realized how different these processes are for me.

Feelings aside, there’s a lot of media going on here. Podcast, Skype, Texting and a strange narrative to tie it all together. I can share a podcast with the internet world — a scope too large to properly comprehend — and even 5 hours apart, the media can still connect two friends. The internet is like a wormhole, bringing two distant points in space through some higher dimension together, creating a shortcut between them.

But what speaks most about our culture’s integration of, obsession with, and dependence on screens is the predictive text feature on many of our phones. Yes it’s a fun game to play across any distance, but how does the existence of this feature make meaning?

First, written language was done by hand — on stone or wood, then paper. Then we learned to type with ten fingers. Then we learned to type with two thumbs. Now we’re not supposed to type at all? For any conspiracy theorists out there, this predictive text feature is teaching our devices to think for us, to learn our language, bringing us ever closer to “the singularity,” or the point when our technology becomes our masters.

For now, AI and robots taking over the world are merely great pieces of science fiction, but in many ways, the singularity has come and gone. What are we to do without our smartphones, our laptops, the internet, WiFi, GPS? Even self-driving cars are on the horizon. Society at large has become totally dependent on our toys, a life without them seems unbearable, dare I say impossible.

The toys and tools are not bad in and of themselves of course, but asking them to do everything for us seems to me to be a symptom of bigger issues within the human condition: a deep need for connection and community, and a subconscious awareness of our futility. If everyone is forgotten in the end, let’s preserve our activity. But also, if the fruits of our labour will wither when we do, why bother labouring in the first place if we can build something that can do it for us?

I’m exaggerating a little, but not by much.

Media and technology have invaded, and for better and worse, we have welcomed them with open arms.

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